Ghost Rider #1 Review

With Ghost Rider currently lighting up the small screen, this new debut couldn’t have come at a better time. At least, that would be the case if this first issue had anything to do with the signature skull. Taking a strong backseat to a slew of unnecessary guest stars, the latest from Felipe Smith and Danilo Beyruth hits the road with more of a sputter than a spark.
If all you knew about Robbie Reyes going in to this issue is that he’s a good brother and a demonic vessel, well, you won’t leave with much else. Smith takes a stripped down approach to this first chapter, ultimately letting the opening bio-page tell the reader all they need to know. The bulk of Robbie’s page time revolves around his disabled brother, Gabe, and while there’s certainly a degree of depth that comes with their interactions, it comes off as overly manufactured and not altogether genuine. There’s a lot of tell and not as much show, the driving force of Robbie’s character only loosely defined.
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Source: IGN News
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Ghost Rider #1 Review

South Park: "Not Funny" Review

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.
South Park’s 20th Season is rapidly approaching the endpoint now, and things just keep getting weirder. On top of all the familiar ongoing storylines, “Not Funny” brought a much-loved character back into play after a long absence and showcased Kyle’s mom at her most hysterical. The result was another jam-packed and satisfying installment, though at this point it’s getting hard to imagine the final episode wrapping up these many story threads on a completely satisfying note. There’s a lot of ground still to cover.
A sense of fatalistic doom settled across South Park this week as the town braced for the imminent activation of Troll Trace and the inevitable Fort Collins-style post-apocalyptic meltdown that will follow. But leave it to Kyle to swoop in and save the day (or at least try to) with one of his trademark pep talks. Kyle’s speech was an amusingly meta reflection on the show’s unusual format this season. In the old days, these characters used to be proactive and solve their problems in the course of half an hour. Now they’ve resigned to sit back and suffer through an entire season of the same conflicts, week after week.
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Source: IGN News
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South Park: “Not Funny” Review

Autopilot for your Honda: comma.ai goes open source with self driving car kit

GeoHot couldn’t sell his US$1000 self-driving car kit, so he’s giving it away. Faced with the threat of huge fines from the US Dept. of Transport, self-driving car startup comma.ai has open sourced its autonomous driving kit, which anyone can now install using about $700 worth of hardware…
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Category: Automotive



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Source: Gizmag
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Autopilot for your Honda: comma.ai goes open source with self driving car kit

Meat glue and crustacean shells form the right recipe for patching wounds

The kitchen and the laboratory have come together at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, where researchers have developed a method that allows a biodegradable, and biocompatible bioplastic derived from the chitin shells of crustaceans and insects to be used to patch up wounds or hold implanted medical devices in place. The technique involves combining the material with a cutting edge culinary ingredient called transglutaminase or “meat glue”…
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Category: Medical



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Source: Gizmag
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Meat glue and crustacean shells form the right recipe for patching wounds

Arrow: "Invasion!" Review

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.
This week’s Arrow had a tall order to fill. It was not only the middle act of the massive Invasion crossover, but also the 100th episode of the series. How do you go about trying to push the larger crossover forward while also taking the time to celebrate such a significant milestone. The solution, it seems, was to worry less about the former and more about the latter. This episode definitely worked better as “Arrow: Episode 100” than it did “Invasion: Act Two.”
This episode revolved around a pretty common trope in superhero storytelling, with the hero being shown the life they might have had if they had never put on their costume and resisting the urge to stay in that false reality forever. It’s a story that’s been told in many forms over the years, with a couple notable, DC-themed examples being Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ “For the Man Who Has Everything” in Superman Annual #11 and the Batman: The Animated Series Episode “Perchance to Dream.” We’ve even seen it done in the Arrow-verse before, as Supergirl did its own take on “For the Man Who Has Everything” earlier this year.
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Source: IGN News
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Arrow: “Invasion!” Review

Cadillac returns to endurance with DPi-V.R prototype

Cadillac is returning to endurance racing after a 14-year absence. Its slickly designed DPi-V.R race car is primed for what the company calls “America’s fastest and most technologically advanced sports car competition.” After a reveal today, the car will compete in the Prototype class of the 2017 IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, making its debut at the Rolex 24 at Daytona next month…
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Source: Gizmag
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Cadillac returns to endurance with DPi-V.R prototype

Vikings: Midseason Premiere Review

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.
“Forgive me for all my faults. All of my failings.”
The second half of Vikings’ fourth season — which basically feels like a fifth season thanks to that time jump at the end of midseason finale — kicked things off with a ragged, regretful Ragnar weighed down by his massive failures. “The Outsider” featured the fractured King doing somewhat of a (final) apology tour as he visited upon his sons, Floki, and Lagertha in an attempt to reconnect, once more, with his past before offing himself.
This was an excellent way to bring us fully, and quietly, into the time jump. It allowed us to meet new characters (some actually new, others new because they’re now grown) while reflecting upon the entire journey so far. Ragnar’s life with Lagertha, his frayed friendship with Floki, the doomed settlement over in Wessex – the breadth of the entire series to date was at the center of this one and the idea that one is only as beloved as their last triumph, or despised as their last mistake, truly hit home.
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Source: IGN News
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Vikings: Midseason Premiere Review

Stanford's new nontoxic hydrogels are made to scale

Flexible, absorbent and versatile, hydrogels are found in everyday products like diapers and contact lenses, and have shown promise in repairing electronics, killing drug-resistant bacteria, stemming bleeding and keeping ship hulls barnacle-free. But as useful as they are, manufacturing them can be costly and hard to scale up. Now, scientists at Stanford have developed new hydrogels made from common and inexpensive natural materials, which are easily adjusted to suit a range of applications…
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Category: Materials



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Hydrogels

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Source: Gizmag
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Stanford’s new nontoxic hydrogels are made to scale