New Super Mario Bros. U Is Reportedly Coming to Switch

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, and Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze have shown that Nintendo is more than willing to flesh out Switch’s library with Wii U ports. And if a new report is to be believed, the next Wii U game to make the jump could be New Super Mario Bros. U.
Comic Book reports multiple sources, who are purportedly “linked with Nintendo,” have suggested New Super Mario Bros. U will be updated and re-released for Switch “as early as this year.”
According to the site’s sources, Nintendo plans to package the New Super Luigi U DLC with the Switch port. While the DLC and base game were originally released separately — in 2013 and 2012, respectively — they were later sold together as part of the Nintendo Selects line of budget-priced Wii U games.Continue reading…
Source: IGN News
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New Super Mario Bros. U Is Reportedly Coming to Switch

No, Netflix Isn't Introducing Unskippable Ads During Shows

Despite what you may have heard, Netflix is not introducing unskippable ads during shows.
Although some Reddit users have claimed to be hit by unskippable ads while binging their favorite shows, a Netflix spokesperson confirmed to IGN that the ads are actually personalized recommendations the company is currently testing, and users can skip them if they are not interested.
According to the spokesperson, the test is temporary and only affects a small subset of users. “At Netflix, we conduct hundreds of tests every year so we can better understand what helps members more easily find something great to watch.”
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Source: IGN News
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No, Netflix Isn’t Introducing Unskippable Ads During Shows

ESA astronaut controls humanoid robot from space station

An astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) took a stroll around the Earth by proxy today, thanks to a new robotics system. A little after 11:30 am CEST (09:30 GMT), ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took remote command of the humanoid robot Rollin’ Justin at the DLR German Aerospace Center establishment in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. It was a two-hour test of the latest technology that will allow future expedition crews to explore other planets while remaining in orbit about them…
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Source: Gizmag
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ESA astronaut controls humanoid robot from space station

AC Odyssey's Mercenaries Provide Unending Challenges

In addition to its transition into a full-fleged RPG, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is introducing multiple revamped mechanics systems, from its signature naval combat to the ever-changing world of Ancient Greece. One element in particular that’s meant to give players an added layer of immersion and challenge throughout the course of the game:a bounty system featuring randomly-generated elite enemies scattered throughout the world.
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Source: IGN News
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AC Odyssey’s Mercenaries Provide Unending Challenges

Nanotube coating smartens up fabrics

Imagine if there were comfortable and inexpensive wearable fabrics that were capable of detecting a wide range of pressure and motion. Well, scientists at the University of Delaware have created just such a technology, and it could have some interesting applications…
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Source: Gizmag
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Nanotube coating smartens up fabrics

F1 2018 Review – A Real Team Effort

I’m not an F1 aficionado, but I appreciate the sheer effort by the drivers and race teams to be the best on and off the track. That passion comes through in a relatable way in F1 2018, a title that constantly pushes you to excel while also giving you the tools to reach victory.

The impressive part of F1 2018’s career mode isn’t just the nooks and crannies of the R&D tech tree (now with a fog of war), it’s the way everything nestles together. Your actions and decisions reverberate around your racing organization, letting you feel the enormity of the task, but also making it relatable and within reach. Yes, you’re just one person in this mammoth enterprise, but this is one instance where the right hand actually knows what the left hand is doing.

It’s the first of three pre-qualification practices, and a good way to get to know the track is to go through the Track Acclimatization program (hitting the right gates into/out of turns) for some resource points. These are spent on the R&D tree between race weekends. I’m not sure which direction to go in, so the engineer for my Renault team recommends new pistons. Sounds good. I’m rivals with Red Bull’s Max Verstappen, so I can’t shrug off these practice programs before the race. I need to earn resource points to keep pace with Red Bull’s own R&D advances as well in order to be competitive on the track.

During the ensuing race, I’m told my internal combustion engine (ICE) is losing power, which partly explains why I’m getting caught on the straightaways – that and Lewis Hamilton is just going to do that until our organization improves. I make a mental note to check to see how much wear is on the current ICE and whether I need to fit a new one.

After the race I put in a new one and check the rest of my power unit and gearbox for wear. Luckily nothing else needs replacing for the moment. The rest of the news, however, isn’t good. The streamlined suspension arms the aero team started work on a few weeks ago have arrived but they failed test, which means I have to spend more points to have them redone.

Ironically, the next time I’m in front of the press, I’m sure to mention how good my aero department is, which boosts their morale and cuts down the chance of such failures happening again. I also plug my chassis department. I’m eyeing new calipers, and I’d like to keep the discount I currently have running with them.

Towards the end of the season we’re blindsided with the news that regulations next season are going to wipe out three aero upgrades. Although they remain viable for the current season, I have to spend over 1,000 points to keep them for next year.

Come contract time I’ve earned enough respect with my bosses through my finishes, rivalry wins (including one with my teammate), and performance in invitational events, that I’m in a place to negotiate an upgrade in the R&D time as well as a bump in the amount of resource points I get for races. I’m on my way up in the world, but it’s just the start.

As busy as it may sound, getting elbows deep into your race team isn’t overwhelming because it’s well organized. It’s more about putting one foot in front of the other than herding kittens. You can run through seven different practice programs over three practice sessions, which are more than enough opportunities to get resource points. Although the programs are the same through your entire career, they’re both instructional and applicable to each race. For instance, the fuel economy program shows you how to conserve fuel for the track as well as lets the team know how little fuel they can get away with during the race while still running good laps.

 

The game keeps you busy, but it doesn’t gussy up the daily grind. Some of the race intro/exit cutscenes are the same as previous years, the interview sessions (as useful as they are) grow stale, and even with the rivalries and having to throw divisions of your R&D department under the bus to the media at times, the game has an air of restraint. Unfortunately, it doesn’t indulge in the sport’s drama, and even your successes feel muted.

That changes when you’re racing, thankfully. The cars’ handling conveys both the enormous power at your disposal and the subtle skill needed to master it entering and exiting corners. During the longer races you notice things like tire wear, the type of tires you’re using, and the importance of keeping out of danger. One race I slightly damage my front wing, meaning I had to deal with understeer until it was fixed.

Racing is a mix of the immediate (the next corner) with the long-term (your pit and tire strategy) that can be challenging. My brain scrambled when my engineer announced rain was on the way. Not only do I hate driving in the stuff, but I had to grapple with that devil’s proposition of how long I could stay out before it hit. A handy in-race HUD gives information and allows adjustments while you’re driving, but it can be a handful to read and bring up while you’re in the thick of the action. Plus, some of the options like the fuel mixture and the differential are not well explained. Thankfully, handling the new ERS – a system that recovers and deploys energy while you’re driving – is easier to use.

In addition to career mode, F1 2018 also features one-off scenario events, a 22-player multiplayer mode with ranked/unranked sections with a new leveling system for matchmaking, and your customary time trial and other exhibition races. These modes, however, are not the stars of the show.

Racing games are all about strapping yourself in behind the wheel and chasing that checkered flag, but you can’t forget all the hard work put in just to get you to the start/finish line in the first place. F1 2018’s excellent career mode skillfully lets you enjoy the fruits of both labors.


Source: GameInformer News
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F1 2018 Review – A Real Team Effort

The Automatica automates pour-over coffee in a charming and totally unnecessary way

Most mornings, after sifting through the night’s mail haul and skimming the headlines, I make myself a cup of coffee. I use a simple pour-over cone and paper filters, and (in what is perhaps my most tedious Seattleite affectation), I grind the beans by hand. I like the manual aspect of it all. Which is why this robotic pour-over machine is to me so perverse… and so tempting.
Called the Automatica, this gadget, currently raising funds on Kickstarter but seemingly complete as far as development and testing, is basically a way to do pour-over coffee without holding the kettle yourself.
You fill the kettle and place your mug and cone on the stand in front of it. The water is brought to a boil and the kettle tips automatically. Then the whole mug-and-cone portion spins slowly, distributing the water around the grounds, stopping after 11 ounces has been distributed over the correct duration. You can use whatever cone and mug you want as long as they’re about the right size.
Of course, the whole point of pour-over coffee is that it’s simple: you can do it at home, while on vacation, while hiking or indeed at a coffee shop with a bare minimum of apparatus. All you need is the coffee beans, the cone, a paper filter — although some cones omit even that — and of course a receptacle for the product. (It’s not the simplest — that’d be Turkish, but that’s coffee for werewolves.)
Why should anyone want to disturb this simplicity? Well, the same reason we have the other 20 methods for making coffee: convenience. And in truth, pour-over is already automated in the form of drip machines. So the obvious next question is, why this dog and pony show of an open-air coffee bot?
Aesthetics! Nothing wrong with that. What goes on in the obscure darkness of a drip machine? No one knows. But this — this you can watch, audit, understand. Even if the machinery is complex, the result is simple: hot water swirls gently through the grounds. And although it’s fundamentally a bit absurd, it is a good-looking machine, with wood and brass accents and a tasteful kettle shape. (I do love a tasteful kettle.)
The creators say the machine is built to last “generations,” a promise which must of course be taken with a grain of salt. Anything with electronics has the potential to short out, to develop a bug, to be troubled by humidity or water leaks. The heating element may fail. The motor might stutter or a hinge catch.
But all that is true of most coffee machines, and unlike those, this one appears to be made with care and high-quality materials. The cracking and warping you can expect in thin molded plastic won’t happen to this thing, and if you take care of it, it should at least last several years.
And it better, for the minimum pledge price that gets you a machine: $450. That’s quite a chunk of change. But like audiophiles, coffee people are kind of suckers for a nice piece of equipment.
There is of course the standard crowdfunding caveat emptor; this isn’t a pre-order but a pledge to back this interesting hardware startup, and if it’s anything like the last five or six campaigns I’ve backed, it’ll arrive late after facing unforeseen difficulties with machining, molds, leaks and so on.


Source: Feedburner Tech Gadgets
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The Automatica automates pour-over coffee in a charming and totally unnecessary way